How the Carlos Hill Case Fell to Pieces

The man accused of fleecing thousands of Jamaicans of billions of dollars in a failed Ponzi scheme, Carlos Hill — is now a free man.

The case against him fell apart this morning in the Home Circuit Court, in Kingston.

Many people have been expressing shock on social media about the outcome of the case, and are criticising the justice system.

Hill was freed of the fraud charges after the presiding judge instructed the jury to deliver a not guilty verdict.

The Crown offered no evidence in the case, saying it wouldn’t be able to prove the fraud charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

It had called 16 witnesses. But only one showed up for court today.

Carlos Hill’s multi-billion dollar ponzi scheme — Cash Plus — collapsed in 2008. And, nine years later, the prosecution has failed to mount a viable case against him.

The big problem — victims were unwilling to appear in court to give evidence. The prosecution had alleged that Hill defrauded more than 40-thousand investors of more than $10-billion.

However, only one witness, Lois Grant, showed up for court today. She’s angry about the abrupt end to the case.

Ms. Grant says she lost millions in the Ponzi scheme. She says she’s surprised many other alleged victims lashed out on social media but failed to show up to court.

Prosecutor, Adley Duncan, told the court they also could not find witnesses who worked for Cash Plus.

He said these persons would know the financial affairs of the company. He says they were subpoenaed but failed to attend court.

Mr. Duncan said with a matter of this nature, he thought they’d have many statements from aggrieved witnesses. But Ms. Grant says the prosecution did not do enough to reach out to those affected.

Meanwhile, one of Hill’s attorneys, Deborah Martin, says another witness tried to give a statement today.

Hill was arrested and charged in 2008 in connection with the collapse of the Cash Plus Ponzi scheme.

He was charged with fraudulently inducing and attempting to induce persons to invest in Cash Plus and Cash Plus group — the five-year-old multi-billion dollar scheme.

Affected persons are being encouraged to seek compensation settlements in the Civil Court.

Meanwhile, Director of Public Prosecutions, DPP, Paula Llewellyn is rejecting suggestions that her office didn’t do enough to get the witnesses to come forward in the Carlos Hill fraud trial.

Ms. Llewellyn says most of the witnesses refused to participate.

She says others lost interest in the case after realising there would not be compensated at the end of the trial.

Meanwhile, the DPP says the only witness available today was not an investor in Cash Plus.

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