Jamaica Getting Hotter; Summers Getting Longer

Ninety-eight percent of the days in Jamaica will be scientifically defined as hot by the end of this century.

That’s according to Professor Michael Taylor, Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus. He says this warming will have tremendous implications for resources, such as the demand for water.

Professor Taylor is also a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC. He was addressing the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association Conference now underway at the Hilton Rose Hall in Montego Bay, St James.

The year 2100 sounds so far away. But, think about it; our children being born this year will be 82-years-old, so the end of this century could be within our children’s lifetime. And certainly, our grandchildren will live to experience the catastrophic effects of climate change being predicted now, if nations around the globe fail to act decisively and now.

According to Professor Michael Taylor, their world will be a lot different from ours; significantly hotter and drier, creating a demand for resources, especially water, that we’ve never seen before.

In an inspired presentation this morning, Professor Taylor said we’re seeing the emergence of a new climate era.

Multiple risks like hotter days, higher seas flooding our tiny Caribbean islands and stronger hurricanes. And, he says it will be unrelenting.

Not just that; he says this brave new world of our children and our children’s children, will be unfamiliar and unprecedented.

Meanwhile, Professor Taylor says there’s evidence that Jamaica’s summers are lasting longer.

He says the country’s rain patterns have also changed.

And, he says since the year 2000, there’s been a significant increase in the number of hurricanes that have come close to the island.

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