Tesha Miller Remains in Custody After Being Fined JMD$100

The reputed leader of the Spanish Town-based, Klansman Gang, Tesha Miller, will likely spend tonight in jail.

Miller was today fined $100 or 10 days in prison.

This, after he pleaded guilty to one count of making a false declaration when he appeared in the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Court this morning. He paid the fine but has been re-arrested by the police.

Miller’s lawyer, Bert Samuels, is this afternoon furious about his client’s arrest soon after being released by the court.

Mr. Samuels says Miller is now being held under the Anti-Gang Law. He says he and his client were shocked by his arrest under the anti-gang law.

Miller returned to Jamaica two weeks ago after being deported from the Bahamas for entering that country illegally.

He was immediately picked up by local police and charged last Thursday for making a false declaration.

Today, after pleading guilty to Making False a Declaration he was fined $100 or 10 days in prison.

Mr. Samuels says he’ll be seeking a Writ of Habeas Corpus tomorrow to have Miller released.

Miller has been on police radar since his release from prison and deportation from the United States last year for illegal entry.

Police named him as a person of interest after an increase in murders in the St. Catherine North Division soon after his release.

There were suggestions that infighting in the Klansman Gang contributed to the increase in murders.

However, at that time, Miller was never formally named a suspect. Mr. Samuels says the police are playing games with Miller’s liberty.

Earlier on Tuesday, Parish Court judge, Sanchia Burrell, said the sentence handed down to Miller is ’embarrassing’.

She criticized the Crown for not being able to offer evidence against the alleged gangster.

Miller pleaded not guilty to deceiving the Jamaica Consulate in the Bahamas on March 15.

The Crown had charged Miller for intending to deceive immigration authorities by making a false declaration to obtain an emergency passport in the name ‘Marlon Andre Williams’.

The Clerk of Court disclosed that the name at the top of a document Miller presented to immigration was ‘Tesha Miller.’

However, the signature at the bottom of the document was ‘Marlon Andre Williams.’

The Crown contended that the signature didn’t match the name.

But Presiding Judge, Sancia Burrell, said there was no rule that stipulates the signature should’ve been the same as his name.

She says the signature could’ve been a triangle or some other symbol that’s different from the given name at the top of the document.

The investigating officer further informed the judge that Miller was questioned by an immigration officer about his name.

This, based on what was said to be her prior knowledge of his name being Tesha Miller.

The investigating officer says Miller told the immigration officer he uses the name ‘Marlon Andre Williams.’

When the judge asked for a statement detailing the evidence of such, the Crown was unable to provide it.

The investigating officer says he did not have the document and would have to seek mutual legal assistance to obtain it from the Bahamas.

Miller’s attorney, Bert Samuels, insisted on having the matter end today.

He asked for his client to be pleaded sometime after 1:00 this afternoon after a delay in the morning session.

On the first count of false declaration on March 15, the Crown quietly offered no evidence and Miller pleaded not guilty.

On the second count, Miller pleaded guilty to making a false declaration on April 4 at the Norman Manley International Airport that his name was ‘Marlon Andre Williams’, knowing his name is ‘Tesha Miller.

Miller, who’d been in custody for the last 13 days, was fined the maximum fine of 100-dollars or 10-days in prison.

Some people in court appeared surprised by the fine.

Judge Burrell told Miller she hoped he was prepared to pay the fine or would call a family member to help if he couldn’t manage it.

She described the sentencing as embarrassing. She chastised the Crown for having an incomplete file. She says there needed to be more urgency in completing files.

And, while she agreed persons are free to sign how they wish, she encouraged Miller not to write a whole name that’s so different from ‘the one his mother gave him’.

Judge Burrell says that’s going to cause the authorities to pause. Miller nodded with a smile.

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